Friday, February 25, 2011

French Fridays with Dorie - Red Wine and Port Braised Short Ribs


This week's French Fridays with Dorie recipe is the ultimate, cozy French supper for a group of friends.

You'll want a group of friends around your farmhouse table because the recipe calls for nine pounds of short ribs, an entire bottle of flavorful, fruity California Syrah, and a half bottle of Tawny Port. The ribs are seared, and layered snugly in your largest Dutch oven atop a sauteed, aromatic bed of carrots, onions, celery, garlic and ginger. In goes the wine, port, beef stock, and a bouquet garni of parsley, celery leaves, thyme, rosemary, bay leaves, and star anise. After three hours of slow-braising, the tantalizingly tender ribs are lifted from their luscious sauce while the sauce is strained and reduced. An added bonus to the finished ribs is the gremolata of chopped Italian parsley, finely grated tangerine or orange peel, and minced garlic.


We served our short ribs on a mound of creamy Celery Root and Potato Puree, accompanied by steamed baby carrots, and roasted kale. Dessert was this month's Daring Baker's Challenge, Meyer Lemon and Basil Panna Cotta with Blackberry Puree, and Italian Florentine Lace Cookies.

Although French Fridays with Dorie members are prohibited from posting the recipe in their blog posts, I did find a slightly adapted version of the recipe published by the Bon Appetit, here.

Newf Notes:

In San Diego, short ribs will set you back a little over $5/lb.  In other words, making the entire recipe with 9 pounds of ribs, wine, and port, can get expensive - you should invite only your closest friends and family...kidding. It's not that bad when you consider the recipe feeds 6-8 people and short ribs at a gourmet restaurant are $20-$30.  However, the recipe can easily be halved, as it was in Bon Appetit's version.

Dorie suggests broiling the short ribs first, but I seared the ribs (in batches) in the dutch oven I used for the braising, and sauteed the vegetables in all that goodness left from the searing. I forgot to buy ginger, but the star anise added nice flavor. There is so much braising liquid at the end, so I chose to transfer about half to another pan and reduced that down for the sauce. The gremolata is a must.

These short ribs are hearty, comforting, and layered with magnificent flavor. I highly recommend preparing the entire batch and rounding up your friends.


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19 comments:

Creating Amazing Meals said...

What a professional shot! I agree, the Gremolata really set the dish off. Lovely presentation.

lola said...

Gotcha beat! In Oklahoma I paid $6.59 a pound for short ribs. We hope to pay off the 2nd mortgage soon:)
I love your photo with baby carrots. Excellent idea.

Cher said...

Lovely plating! I guess I consider myself extremely fortunate to only have paid 3.99 a pound. I guess we are just not that trendy in this neck of the woods and don't know that these are such a hot commodity!

Mary said...

This is definitely a dish to share with friends. Great picture.

yummychunklet said...

Ooh, nice tip on the braising. And, your photo looks amazing.

Karen said...

Fantastic photo! :) Glad these turned out so well for you!

Betsy said...

Love the baby carrots. I served mine with a celery root puree too (mashed celery root and potatoes). Yum!

Sis. Boom. said...

What a lovely shot and you are right. Only ones CLOSEST friends are deserving of something so tasty!

bunkycooks said...

We could have been there with you all to enjoy these ribs, but we were fortunate enough to dine and drink with you in Ne Orleans instead!

Maybe we can prepare something like this together some day!

Now that you are home...what are we cooking next? ;)

Gwen

tricia s. said...

What an amazing shot- superb photos as usual. You really captured the whole concept we embraced as well, about the close friend/family meal and enjoying the hearty winter fare. Love what you pared yours with. Nana and I enjoyed our results (family too) and I know I will be braising again in the near future. Extra credit points to you for posting from an airport :) Can't wait to read about the dessert !

Carmen said...

Amazing dish! The photo is worth drooling over too.

kellypea said...

This looks so good! I've often heard of this group cooking through Dorie's book and am kicking myself for not yet having the book. Found you on the Daring Bkers's forum -- always looking for local bloggers!

Angela said...

Looks beautiful. I love roasted kale. Grilled kale this week for the first time and it was delicious! Wonderful post. Bon Appétit

Steph said...

Great photo! I think these were worth every penny...such great comfort food.

Kitchenarian said...

Great job with this week's recipe. I did half the recipe and my short ribs were still "cozy" in my Staub pot.

I agree, the gremolata was amazing. I think I am going to start putting it on everything! Love your picture and your post.

lifeisfull said...

Great photo! One of the reasons I didn't do this recipe was the cost factor. Short ribs cost $5/lb here too!

Lynne said...

Looks beautiful! I like the idea of searing the ribs in a Dutch oven first as it is what I do with beef or pork when making a stew. I'm sorry I missed this one! Lovely plating, too.

Flourchild said...

Your trip sounds fun! In Idaho thee cost of short ribs in 5.00 a pound, I passed and got reg. beef ribs!
Your pictures look great!

Lana said...

Beautiful photo! I was grumbling about the price, too, but relented - after all, we did not need all 9 pounds (our girls are light eaters). But it is a comforting and rich dish worthy of a celebratory dinner with good friends.
I forgot to add the gremolata, even tough I had prepared it:( Next time I'll remember - it makes the photo:)